Tag Archives: Umbro

Umbro England 2012 Football Shirt

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Umbro have unveiled the new England shirt, always a highly anticipated release and the first time the design is purely white with red trim makes for an interesting design. Featuring a woven collar with red inner stripe rib and striped rib cuff detail on the arms, the shirt also features an embroidered red England crest and red Umbro double diamond on the chest. Front body darts provide extra fit and comfort, while under-arm panels offer extra movement and breathability. A certain amount of controversy has come about the release of a new shirt following the previous design was only worn eight times by the national team, creating a bit of frustration by the fans. In my opinion not a patch on the last two home shirts. None the less, a great design and one that will be seen on the pitch, on the terraces and on the streets. Heres the new keeper jersey as well..

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Umbro x Aitor Throup Archive Research Project

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The Archive Research Project developed by Aitor Throup for umbro has become another standout project between another sports maker and designer. The former Stone Island and CP Company designer made his mark when designing the England football kit and has further extended his relationship with umbro with this project that has seen pieces from the archive reworked by his critique. Notable items include the Ramsey jacket, derived from the piece Alf Ramsey wore when England lifted the World Cup in 1966 in addition to the Taped Track jacket and Drill top, the 1960’s Aztec Jersey amongst other pieces.

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Umbro Archive Research Project Designed by Aitor Throup

Umbro dipped into their archives of English football tailoring heritage to build a seven piece lifestyle collection designed by Aitor Throup. Throup used the shape of a body in motion as his inspiration for the collection, creating each style on a bust form in a running position. All of the performance elements the brand is known for are kept firmly intact. There are seven pieces: the 1966 Jacket, Aztex Jersey, Diamond Tape Track Jacket, 1970 World Cup Jersey, Drill Top, Drill Pant and ‘Barcelona’ Short. Enjoy!

Umbro x Aitor Throup: Archive Research Project

Umbro are to present a new capsule collection by Aitor Throup at Pitti Uomo in Florence, Italy, January 2011. Umbro, in collaboration with the critically acclaimed conceptual designer Aitor Throup, has delved into its extensive archive to launch the Archive Research Project. Taking inspiration from iconic Umbro football garments – spanning the last 50 years – A.R.P. showcases a refined vision of Aitor Throup’s unique approach to football-specific tailoring. A.R.P. represents design innovation and style, whilst maintaining Umbro’s English football tailoring heritage

New York Cosmos Kit By Umbro

A bit of soccer news that might surprise a few of you. The New York Cosmos, famed for bringing Pele to the United States in the 1970s, has reformed. As part of the rebirth, Umbro has come on as official kit supplier and applied the same balance of fine tailoring and on-field performance we’ve seen in the latest England strips.

A bit about the New York Cosmos-

Under new passionate ownership, The New York Cosmos continues its tradition of greatness for the next generation and vows to maintain the same ethos that made The New York Cosmos the most celebrated soccer club in the history of the United States. During its existence from 1971-1985, The New York Cosmos won five national championships. Today, as part of its rebirth and with soccer legend and former Cosmos star Pelé as the Honorary President, The New York Cosmos will continue to inspire and develop the youth through academies, camps and clinics while also attracting world-class soccer players to participate in its soccer movement. The club’s ultimate vision is to be a part of Major League Soccer and to compete for the championship.

Relaunched in August 2010, The New York Cosmos is committed to helping improve the future of football with significant investment in grassroots and youth football, and providing elite coaching philosophies and training opportunities.

The New York Cosmos has launched two elite youth academies, Cosmos Academy East (in New York) and Cosmos Academy West (in Los Angeles) with former Major League Soccer stars Giovanni Savarese and Teddy Chronopoulos appointed as Academy Directors, respectively.  Both academies participate in the U.S. Soccer Development Academy. Furthermore, The New York Cosmos acquired the Copa NYC tournament, and beyond running it every year in New York, they will be looking to expand it both domestically and internationally in order to engage more local communities to participate in the global game’ at a grassroots level.

The kit is available to buy from soccer.com in December.

World Cup Kit Review


Like all major sporting events, the 2010 FIFA World Cup is a media circus. Between egos, injuries and WAGS, the scoreline isn’t the only thing grabbing the headlines. Also detracting our attention from the beautiful game: the kits. Internationally, football or soccer is both a lucrative and competitive industry, with the likes of Nike, Umbro, Adidas and Puma vying for the monopoly. To put things in perspective, almost 30% of Nike’s total revenue in 2009 came out of Europe, Africa and the Middle East, where football culture is as big as baseball in the US. In 2008, Nike purchased Umbro, arguably the O.G. of soccer apparel; their sales have since increased over 200% to $174 million annually.

Unlike the NFL or NBA, where the entire league sticks to one shirt sponsor, FIFA is fair game. From Japan to Slovenia to Honduras, each soccer ‘kit’ is a who’s who of all the prominent sporting brands. Where some brands don’t believe in reinventing the wheel, like Adidas for Argentina, others are content to reinvent the wheel as they see it fit, like Nike for the USA. There are varying degrees of success – we’ve seen our share of stinkers (look at any of the Mexican Goalkeeper kits that their goalie Campos designed!! – but here are a few that we feel deserve a shout out

Of course Umbro for England: Ever since Nike acquired Umbro we’ve seen less and less of the iconic diamond-within-a-diamond logo that once dominated soccer apparel from head to toe. The British brand has lost much of its visibility in the past ten years; opportunity cost when you’re living comfortably under Nike’s wing. Meanwhile, the English national team has always been sponsored and designed by Umbro. England is a team that underwent a massive tactical makeover leading up to the tournament, hiring a no-nonsense coach in Fabio Capello and adopting a style of play stripped of individual flair. Umbro, seemingly taking full advantage of Nike’s design resources, went for a look that compliments this new outlook: classy, minimal, no frills. Its a great look whose versatility is a win both on a off the pitch. Check out this article on the designer of the kit Aitor Throup over at SlamxHype

Nike for the Netherlands: The Dutch normally wear orange, and like England they wisely avoid the Ed Hardy look by keeping it simple. Their away kit gets a little more interesting. Over the years Holland has played with a number of variations on a white, red and blue stripe, featuring it as a diagonal line, a horizontal line running along the diaphragm and, now, a V-shape. Although I feel their previous powder blue kit was a better look, this year’s white away jersey with the V-shape line going hand-in-hand with Nike’s ‘V for Victory’ campaign is a class act

Puma for the Ivory Coast: Strength, athleticism, prowess: these are the qualities of African soccer that the Ivory Coast embodies so beautifully. With a starting lineup boasting Didier Drogba and the Toure brothers, a trio whose skill is matched only by their physical presence, you can imagine how intimidating these guys look sporting a fierce orange kit. In March, Puma earned a Red Dot Design Award for the Italian team’s jersey, whose winning look and revolutionary makeup has since been adopted by African sides Ghana, Cameroon and the Ivory Coast. A design that emphasizes comfort and breathability, a style that hugs the body and accentuates ‘the strength of the chest and arms.

Check out some of the worst kits here